News & Announcements Archive

Apr 2021

April Generous Congregation Supports UU Ministry For Earth (UUMFE)
TEXT NOW TO SUPPORT UUMFE

 
Climate change is happening and it’s human-caused. This will affect almost every area of life including the economy and our health. Whether it’s the cost of damage from extreme weather or the number of hospitalizations from asthma, issues arising from climate change are only getting worse.
 
The Unitarian Universalist Ministry For Earth (UUMFE) aims to be a wellspring of spiritual and educational grounding and practical support for bold, accountable action for environmental justice, climate justice, and the flourishing of all life. They have a variety of programs, tools, and actions for everyone from youth through elders to help avert climate chaos while following the core spiritual practice of Unitarian Universalism.
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to UUMFE. With your support, we can help to empower bold action, partnership, and connections to promote environmental and climate justice through UUMFE’s campaigns.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and UUFME. To give $10 right now, text “$10 GCC” (or another amount) to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 
 

Dining for Dollars is BACK! 

 
 
Hello UUs at UUSM!  Remember this poster?
 
Dining for Dollars is BACK!
 
Our congregation is mostly surviving the pandemic, and though we are not quite ready to return to in-person events, we can get together online to have some fun!
 
In May 2021, we will have the UUSM Spring Auction, which is our way of doing Dining for Dollars online.  In the first auction, held over the holidays, several people hosted events that involved food and drink: there was a pizza-making class, a beer-tasting as well as a wine-tasting get-together, even a Beatles trivia event.  Also, many items were sold: textiles, jewelry, and antiques.
 
  • Bidding for the Spring Auction will take place Sunday May 16th through Sunday May 23rd.
  • Events will be held between end of May and Ingathering.
 
Can you think of a Zoom-friendly event that YOU might host?  Something that would bring people together, that could make money for the Church AND bring people together?
 
Offer an event soon!  Contact us at auction@uusm.org
 
Thanks!
 
Beth, Pat , Greg, Karl
 

Please Save the Date:  A Celebration of the Life  of  Rev. Ernest D. Pipes, Jr. - 
October 6, 1926 – February 10, 2021
 

 
Saturday, May 1, 2021, 1 PM 
 
Rev. Jeremiah Kalendae & Rev. Judith Meyer Officiating 
 
An invitation with a Zoom link will be emailed prior to the service
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Save the Date! UUSM Camp at de Benneville Pines

 
 
We are planning for Friday, Saturday, Sunday – September 17, 18 and 19, 2021.
 
“May it be so.”
 
Stay tuned…
 

2021 Women’s Virtual Spring Retreat at Camp de Benneville Pines, April 30-May 2
FOCUSING ON WORK THAT RECONNECTS

 
 
Friday, April 30 to Sunday, May 2, 2021
 
Presented by Dean Kathleen Moscato, Rev. Dr. Beth Johnson,
and members of Palomar UU Fellowship, Vista CA
 
“The Spiral of Resilience & Renewal”
 
Keynote: Rev. Dr. Beth Johnson
 
Join Palomar UU Fellowship of Vista, CA as we celebrate the 60th anniversary of Camp de Benneville Pines and explore “The Spiral of Resilience & Renewal”!
 
These challenging times have taught us the importance of being present to and honoring all of our experiences, our feelings and bodies. This experiential keynote will create a space to ground together and process whatever is present through our bodies so that we can effectively channel our energy into what is needed and what is ours to do.
 
Participants will engage in a four-part spiral design of experiential processes and practices from the Work that Reconnects, developed by Joanna Macy, now including an equity lens, that will: ground us in Gratitude, while Honoring our Pain for the World, exploring what is possible in this moment by Seeing with New/Ancient Eyes, and Going Forth with resilience and love.
 
Organizers are still working on the final schedule for this weekend virtual retreat. There will be a wide range of online workshops throughout the weekend, including performances by Emma’s Revolution and Karen Hart. And…as we did at our in-camp retreats, join us on Thursday evening for a pre-retreat get-together hosted by Lonna Leghart.  Come connect with friends (old and new), play some games and have some laughs! Click here to see the “work in progress” schedule. Final schedule will be email to all registrants by no later than Tuesday, April 27th.
 
This retreat is for women 18 years of age and older. Young women, 17 and younger, are invited but must have parent/legal guardian consent.
 
In the spirit of welcoming all, we are offering a sliding scale registration fee based on your assessment of your ability to pay. We have established a base cost of $60 per person as our registration fee and attendees determine what amount they can comfortably contribute. Those who pay at the highest levels are making a donation to help those in financial need for this event. Please remember that for a sliding scale to work, we need the same number of people with means to generously pay more to balance the needs of those who can afford less. (This is one way we try to build the Beloved Community!) See below for details.
 
This retreat would be a terrific Mother’s Day gift to an important woman in your life or just a way of saying “I support you being the best you can be.” So, grab a friend, family member, or sister-in-spirit and register for this retreat. It’s going to be an awesome weekend!
 
 
Previous joyful Women’s Retreat at Camp de Benneville Pines.
 
 
 
Mar 2021

Bylaws Refresh Task Force 2021 - NEW BYLAWS UNDER CONSIDERATION

Our Bylaws are about to be refreshed! The Bylaws Refresh Task Force has been constituted to realize one of UUSM’s developmental ministry priorities: to update our Bylaws, last amended in 2013, to bring them into alignment with UUA recommendations and create a foundation for our future.
 
Working closely with our Developmental Minister, the Rev. Jeremiah Kalendae, and UUSM Board of Directors President Beth Brownlie as board liaison, the task force will review the current bylaws and make recommendations to reflect our current circumstances, thinking, and our church’s vision. The group will be governed by a RASCI that defines who is Responsible, Accountable, Supported, Consulted, and Informed. They have committed to working in a transparent fashion, with substantial congregational outreach and input and periodic reports to the board.
 
The initial effort is one of discovery as task force members review our current bylaws alongside best practices from Unitarian Universalist Association and other UU congregations. They recognize the need to move forward deliberately and collaboratively with the UUSM congregation.
 
Please contact any of the task for members with any questions or encouragements: Chair Patricia Wright, John Zinner, Bob Dietz; Rev Jeremiah Kalendae (ex officio), and Beth Brownlie (board liaison).
 
 

Consider Coming to Camp - OUR DE BENNEVILLE PINES WEEKEND

 
 
Consider coming to camp — really, start considering it now.  After having to cancel our de Benneville weekend last year, UUSM’s camp committee is putting hope on the calendar.  Save the dates — September 17, 18, and 19th — for a weekend in the mountains that will give us all a chance to relax and renew.
 
If you are a former camper, a would-be camper, or just a fan of mountains and trees, put your name on the “I’m Interested List” by emailing the committee at debenneville@uusm.org.
 
Also, Camp de Benneville Pines needs your support right now!  If you can add on a monthly payment of even $10 a month, you can make a wonderful difference.  Here’s the link for setting up a monthly contribution.
 
The pines and cedars, rocks, jays and flowers, and the wide open skies are calling us.
 
~The Hopeful Camp Committee
 

March Generous Congregation Supports Trans Lifeline
TEXT NOW TO SUPPORT TRANS PEOPLE IN CRISIS

 
 
Many trans people in our community exist in a constant state of survival; survival in a system that judges and marginalizes them. In an unjust system, crisis and distress are normal and rational. Studies have shown that trans persons are at greater risk for suicide as they are twice as likely to think about and attempt suicide than LGB people.
 
Trans Lifeline is a grassroots hotline and microgrants organization offering direct emotional and financial support to trans people in crisis—for the trans community, by the trans community. Founded in 2014, the Hotline remains the only peer-support service in the country in which all operators are transgender. The Hotline has evolved into a comprehensive resource that employs trans people working as paid operators and team leads.
 
In time, Trans Lifeline came to recognize that the epidemic of suicide in the trans community is inextricably tied to the economic justice issues trans people face at alarming rates, and that meaningful emotional support often requires financial support as well. Microgrants provide trans and nonbinary people with low-barrier funds and support to correct names and/or gender markers on identifying legal documents, and support to our trans siblings behind bars.
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to the life-changing work of Trans Lifeline. With your support, we can keep these vital services available to those in our community who need them most.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and Trans Lifeline. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 
 
 
 
Feb 2021

February Generous Congregation Supports The People Concern

A multiplicity of factors has led to an ever-growing number of individuals in crisis and living in cars or on the street, including many working people who cannot afford our city’s high housing costs. A lack of meaningful coordination among government agencies and a focus on criminalizing people who live on the street have converged to disproportionately affect people of color, particularly African Americans. LA’s 2020 count of unhoused persons showed another rise in numbers year over year. And the 2020 count was conducted before the coronavirus pandemic hit. Even with mortgage relief and protection from eviction, the problem could worsen significantly as the pandemic rages and businesses close.

 
One of Los Angeles County’s largest social services agencies, The People Concern, formed in 2016 in a merger of two trusted social service organizations: Ocean Park Community Center (OPCC, an ally long supported by our congregation) and LAMP Community. Informed by more than 57 years of work in the community, The People Concern provides, and advocates for, evidence-based solutions to the multi-faceted challenges of homelessness and domestic violence. A fully integrated system of care – including outreach, interim housing, mental and medical health care, substance abuse services, domestic violence services, life skills and wellness programs, and permanent supportive housing – is tailored to the unique needs of homeless individuals, survivors of domestic violence, challenged youth, and many others who have nowhere else to turn.
 
Generous CongregationUUSM SUpport The People Concern
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to The People Concern. Your support will help one of Los Angeles County’s largest social service agencies empower the most vulnerable among us to rebuild their lives.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and the great work of The People Concern. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 
 

Darwin Day: A Declaration of Interdependence
FEBRUARY FREETHINKER FORUM

 
 
Special AAHS Freethinker Forum—Sunday, February 28, 3:00 to 5:00 pm
 
In February, science enthusiasts along with humanist and liberal religious groups sometimes celebrate the birthday of Charles Darwin to commemorate and reflect on the legacy of his incredible discovery and what it means to our world.
 
UUSM’s Agnostics, Atheists, Humanists and Secularists (AAHS) group will host a special AAHS Freethinker Forum for Darwin Day (note the later start time) this month. We’ll view and discuss a video presentation by the Rev. Dr. David Breeden, Senior Minister of First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis, a Unitarian Universalist congregation originally founded in the late 1800s by a group of people wanting to read and understand Darwin’s work. David asks us to consider how “Darwin’s dangerous idea” interrupted what Western societies had long believed about “the great chain of being,” and how evolution by natural selection continues to both challenge and inspire us.
 
Darwin’s discovery paved the way for a new understanding of what some might call a sacred or meaningful connection to the natural universe, embodied in the 7th UU Principle: “Respect for the interdependent web of all existence, of which we are a part.” Indeed, the legacy of natural selection on the development and evolution of liberal religion in the past 150 years has been profound, and may be under-appreciated. Writing in UU World, the late Rev. Dr. William Murry, former president of Meadville-Lombard Theological school, ruminated:
 
“I believe that evolution by natural selection is one of the most important insights not only in the history of science but in the history of the world because it has radically changed our traditional Western understanding of how we came to be, what we are, and of our place in the world. However, just as it took several hundred years for the full implications of Copernicus’s discovery to be felt, so also all the implications of Darwin’s idea have not yet become fully apparent…
 
Despite the great variety of life forms that have evolved over the millennia, the awareness, rooted in evolutionary biology, of the kinship of all living organisms leads us to regard all human beings as members of one extended family. The spiritual implication of this realization is that we should live together in love and caring, be tolerant of our differences, and take responsibility for one another…
 
Darwin’s idea also fosters a deeper, nature-centered spirituality by shifting the focus away from the supernatural to nature itself—its amazing fecundity and diversity and the remarkable process Darwin called natural selection and descent with modification. In a post-Darwinian world, emotions such as awe and wonder and reverence evoked by the natural world are often identified as religious emotions. A natural spirituality is the result…
 
Every religion needs a story, and Darwin’s idea has given us a place in a new story with multiple layers of meaning. That story, the great epic of cosmic and biological evolution, is a religious story because it calls us out of our little self-centered worlds to see ourselves as part of a great living system. It gives a larger meaning and a broader ethic to our lives. As Darwin wrote at the end of The Origin of Species: ‘There is grandeur in this view of life.'”
 
I’ve thought a great deal about the nexus of science and spirituality since becoming involved with Unitarian Universalism and Humanism. Some of these ideas formed the foundation of two summer sermons about Darwin, Cosmology, and Religious Naturalism that I was privileged to give at UUSM in 2018 and 2019.
 
In this age, as we struggle with the near-term challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic and the long-term threat of the climate crisis, it seems that fostering a closer and deeper connection to the interconnected web of nature and life could not be of more vital importance.
 
All are welcome! Join us at 3:00 for a lively discussion where a diversity of views is welcome and respected! Email aahs@uusm.org for the Zoom link.
 
AAHS (Agnostics, Atheists, Humanists and Secularists) is part of UUSM’s lifespan learning for adults and a member group of the UU Humanist Association. Keep current on future discussions and events via our Facebook Group.
 

Join Us for Beloved Conversations: Virtual!

 
A few months ago, the UUSM Board of Directors authorized our Intersectional Anti-Racism and Anti-Oppression Commission to begin laying the foundation for us to more effectively engage with this critical work. Our first programmatic offering is Beloved Conversations. This faith-formation, anti-racism program offered by the Unitarian Universalist seminary in Chicago, Meadville Lombard Theological School, went virtual last fall and more than 1,200 learners joined the first phase. UUSM is all-in for for the spring semester! This experience of connection and spiritual development is not to be missed.
 
The Spring Term registration closes on February 26, and classes begin March 16, with lessons published every two weeks, as well as biweekly small-group check-ins and monthly large group worship and discussion. In the program’s current phase, ‘Within,’ we engage with a personal exploration of race and our work for racial justice. With two caucuses, our white participants are invited into the Un/learning for Liberation course and our BIPOC+ (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) participants are invited into the Gathering Ourselves course. In Beloved Conversations, we are here to heal the impact of racism on our lives. Learn more at meadville.edu/beloved. The program and our church have full and half scholarships available for those who need them, so please don’t let the cost be an obstacle to your participation.
 
Beloved Conversations—the signature offering of The Fahs Collaborative at Meadville Lombard Theological School—is a program for Unitarian Universalists seeking to embody racial justice as a spiritual practice. In Beloved Conversations, we seek to “get free together.” The program is now offered online and members of our community can study and reflect together in the two separate groups for white and BIPOC Unitarian Universalists to process their unique experiences with racial identity, white supremacy, and racial justice.
 
I want to offer a special thanks to those who stepped up to help advise and lead UUSM’s commission in this tumultuous period of our history: Susan Hendricks Richman, Edna Bonacich, Nalani Santiago, Mike Monte, Linda Van Ligten, James Witker, and Cleo Anderson. Collectively, these leaders bring considerable experience and expertise to this ministry of liberation.
 
How is the program structured?
 
Work in both groups will include six, bi-weekly, online lessons, done at your own pace, using videos, music, and readings, accompanied by reflection prompts and suggested conversations with a Critical Friend chosen by the participants; six bi-weekly small group conversations in a Learning Pod; and three larger, monthly, facilitated Meaning-Making Sessions on Zoom.
 
This curriculum does not require you to sign up as part of a larger congregation or community. However, if you choose, you can agree to engage the curriculum with folks you are already in relationship with from your congregation or community. We hope you will sign up for the work with members in our Santa Monica Community.
 
PLEASE NOTE: This is a virtual learning opportunity. Basic skills with email, simple websites, and the online meeting platform Zoom are essential to successful participation in this program.
 
What are the important dates for Spring Term 2021?
 
February 26: Registration closes for the Spring Term. Once you register and pay, a Welcome & Orientation Lesson will be available on the learning platform.
 
March 16: The first Lesson drops onto the learning platform for individual study and reflection at your own pace (followed approximately every two weeks by Lessons 2-6, through the end of May/beginning of June).
 
Ongoing: Small Group Learning Pod gatherings, approximately every two weeks, as scheduled by your Pod.
 
Meaning Making Sessions Participants will choose one date/time to attend for each of three sessions. If you cannot attend a Session live, they will be partially recorded and posted to the learning platform for later viewing.
 
BIPOC Meaning Making Sessions (Open to all BIPOC participants): Thursdays 5:00 to 6:30 pm Pacific Time or Saturdays 11:00 am to 12:30 pm.
 
White Folks Meaning Making Sessions: (Open to all white participants): Wednesdays 12:00 to 1:30 pm Pacific Time or Wednesdays 5:00 to 6:30 pm or Saturdays 11:00 am to 12:30 pm.
 
How much does it cost?
 
NOTE: Prices are per Term—Fall Term and Spring Term will have different content. You may complete one or both but we are only registering folks for Spring Term 2021 right now.
 
Sliding Scale Pricing (ages 18+):
 
  • $250 US dollars per person
  • $300 US Dollars per person*/**
  • $350 US dollars per person**
 
Full and partial scholarships are available for those who need them (see more info below)
 
*Reparations Note: White participants with the means to do so are encouraged to consider paying an additional $50, in recognition of the historic legacy of racist economic policies and the ways in which generational wealth and greater access to economic opportunity have privileged white people as a group for hundreds of years. These extra funds will go towards providing scholarships to those who need it to participate in this program.
 
**Interdependence Note: Regardless of your racial identity, if your class privilege and/or professional expense budget allows you to pay more so that others may pay less, please consider adding an additional contribution to your total. These extra funds will go towards providing scholarships to those who need it to participate in this program.
 
Equity Note: Regardless of your racial identity, full and partial scholarships are available to those who need them. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. Please contact us at belovedconversations@meadville.edu before registering, to request a scholarship. You may also request a full or half scholarship from the church.
 
How do I register?
 
If you are registering and paying for yourself, there are four steps to signing up:
 
Step 1: Go to www.meadville.edu/beloved to read more about the program. When you have all of the information you need, click the link to our registration page.
 
Step 2: You will register through the curriculum website Teachable for the course that aligns with your racial identity (Gathering Ourselves for BIPOC or Un/Learning for Liberation for white folks). This will include signing up with your name and email address and paying with a credit card or coupon code (or both).
 
Step 3: Once you register and pay, you will be directed to a Google Form we will use to collect the rest of the information we need from you. YOU ARE NOT CONSIDERED REGISTERED FOR THIS PROGRAM UNTIL YOU HAVE COMPLETED THIS GOOGLE FORM.
 
Step 4: Email belovedconversations@uusm.org so we can track your registration at church.
 
Questions? Please check out the Beloved Conversations website at www.meadville.edu/beloved or contact us at belovedconversations@meadville.edu.
 
I hope you’ll consider taking advantage of this wonderful opportunity to join in this transformative work!
 
 

 

Jan 2021

UUSM Online Auction: Zoom Pizza-Making Party
THE FIRST EVENT OF THE SEASON!

 

 
This event was organized on BiddingOwl.com/UUSantaMonica, our (still ongoing) UU Santa Monica auction, and was realized on Zoom.  A great time was had by all!
 
Many items and events are still open at BiddingOwl.com/UUSantaMonica. The auction has been extended through January 6, 2021.
 
Bid high!  Bid often!
 
 
 

Generous Congregation Recipients:  UNICEF, then the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

 
We come together for more than ourselves. On Sunday, January 3, 50% of the offering will be donated to the United Nations Children’s Fund. UNICEF works in the world’s toughest places to reach the most disadvantaged children and adolescents – and to protect the rights of every child, everywhere. Across more than 190 countries and territories, UNICEF does whatever it takes to help children survive, thrive and fulfill their potential, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines, it supports child health and nutrition, safe water and sanitation, quality education and skill building, HIV prevention and treatment for mothers and babies, and the protection of children and adolescents from violence and exploitation. Before, during and after humanitarian emergencies, UNICEF is on the ground, bringing lifesaving help and hope to children and families. Created in 1946, non-political and impartial, UNICEF is never neutral when it comes to defending children’s rights and safeguarding their lives and futures.
 
For the rest of January, 50% of the Sunday offering will be donated to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), an African-American civil rights organization. SCLC is closely associated with its first president, Martin Luther King, Jr., who had a large role in the American civil rights movement.
 
Thank you for your generous support.
 
 
Dec 2020

Christmas Eve Candle Lighting — Light Your Candle 
AN INVITATION

This Christmas Eve service will be like none other. To bring in the sharing of the light that we usually do, we would like to include a candle lighting from as many people as we can get. If you submit a short video of you or your COVID pod lighting a candle following the parameters listed below, we can include it in the December 24th service. Please note the time frame plus the email address and subject line so we can get your video in time to include it with the other elements of the service.

Videos can be submitted with the following parameters:

  • Portrait mode is preferred if possible.
  • Hold steady for at least 5 seconds, then light your candle.
  • Move the lit candle closer to the camera, as if offering the light to the world.
  • Hold that pose for about 30 seconds, before ending the video.

In keeping with the spirit of Christmas Eve and our theme of stillness, be mindful of any background sounds as you are taking the video.

Videos can be sent to worshipassociates@uusm.org with the subject “Candle lighting video” by December 16th.

Here is a demonstration:

What a gift to be able to see as many people as we can this holiday season! Please join us at 6:00 pm Thursday, December 24th as we joyfully sing the carols of the season from around the globe and consider the deeper meaning of the story of Christmas. The night’s offering will benefit the Minister’s Discretionary Fund, which is used to help members and friends in need and to fund special projects throughout the church year.

December Generous Congregation Supports UNICEF

 
 
 
“I am happy for the reopening of child friendly spaces and we missed it a lot during COVID-19” says Muzhgan from Ferdousi Internally Displaced camp, Nahri Shahi district of Balkh, a north province of Afghanistan. In 2019, with partners and through funding from the European Union, UNICEF Afghanistan supported a total of 38,649 children (18,292 girls, 20,357 boys) in the most at risk areas and Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) settlements across Afghanistan. These children benefited from psychosocial support services and essential social services in 234 Child Friendly Spaces (CFSs) in the targeted communities over 4 regions in 15 provinces, bringing the total for the programme to 56,641 children. © UNICEF/UNI367271/Fazel
 
UNICEF, also known as the United Nations Children’s Fund, is a United Nations agency responsible for providing humanitarian and developmental aid to children worldwide. The agency is among the most widespread and recognizable social welfare organizations in the world, with a presence in 192 countries and territories.
 
For more than 70 years, UNICEF has worked in the world’s toughest places to reach the most disadvantaged children and adolescents – and to protect the rights of every child, everywhere. UNICEF’s mission is to help children survive, thrive and fulfill their potential, from early childhood through adolescence.
 
The world’s largest provider of vaccines, UNCEF supports child health and nutrition, safe water and sanitation, quality education and skill building, HIV prevention and treatment for mothers and babies, and the protection of children and adolescents from violence and exploitation.
 
Before, during and after humanitarian emergencies and despite remarkable challenges, UNICEF is on the ground, bringing lifesaving help and hope to children and families. Non-political and impartial, they are never neutral when it comes to defending children’s rights and safeguarding their lives and futures.
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to the UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund. Your donations will help the UNICEF fight for the rights of every child seeking safe shelter, nutrition, protection from disaster and conflicts, and equality.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and UNICEF. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” (or another amount) to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 

Holiday Community Dialogue Circle
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16 AT 7-8:30 PM ON ZOOM

What do “The Holidays” mean to you? How have they been different so far this year? How will they be the same?
 
In the past, the winter holiday season may have meant family reunions, worship in the sanctuary, good food shared with friends, and festive outings. For many, this time of year may amplify an existing sense of loneliness — especially during the pandemic, or alienation from religious beliefs and rituals, or disenchantment with commercialism, or generalized stress. 
 
If you would like to share your thoughts and feelings about the holiday season in a supportive virtual circle, you are invited to a facilitated dialogue on Wednesday, December 16, from 7-8:30pm. In gratitude for the gathered community of caring, we will speak our truths and listen, with compassion and humility, to each other’s deep expressions of self.
 
For further information and to obtain the zoom link, please email stories@uusm.org.
 

Invite a Friend for Christmas Eve Online at UUSM

 
 
 
Nov 2020

November Generous Congregation Supports Lakota People’s Law Project

In 2004, a group of grandmothers in Lakota country — an area comprised of nine Indian reservations in North and South Dakota — asked to investigate and help prevent South Dakota’s Department of Social Services from removing their grandchildren from their families. The investigation uncovered that drugging and routine patterns of physical and mental abuse of Native children in foster care were leading to high levels of youth suicide.

These atrocities, a direct violation of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) — a federal law enacted in 1978 — inspired the formation of the Lakota People’s Law Project (lakotalaw.org). Their mission is to end the cycles of injustice leading to the slow genocide of the Lakota.

In 2016, the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) threatened the Lakota’s sacred lands and water, so the LPLP expanded their mission. The injustices perpetrated against the Lakota during the peaceful and prayerful resistance to DAPL highlighted a blatant pattern of contempt and disregard for the Lakota and their sovereignty.

The Lakota People’s Law Project also works closely with tribal nations and nonprofit compatriots to amplify Indigenous voices, provide renewable solutions in place of fossil fuel consumption, protect the voting rights of Native people, and provide on-the-ground support when and where it is needed most. That includes working with organizers to advance LGTBQ2S rights in Indian Country and help with challenges around COVID-19.

Understanding that Native peoples possess inherent sovereignty and the right to autonomous rule and self-determination, LAPL aims to assist in the reclamation of Indigenous lands and to stop all threats to the Lakota culture.

Generous Congregation

Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.

UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to the Lakota People’s Law Project. Your donations will help the Lakota toward the revitalization of their people and culture.

Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and the Lakota People’s Law Project. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” (or another amount) to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)

 

 
Oct 2020
 
 
Dear Members and Friends, 
 
Our new Chalice Circles are a wonderful small group ministry opportunity to strengthen our community in this time of physical distancing. Your participation will help us to weave the threads of beloved community so our community becomes even more connected this church year. They offer opportunities to share from the heart, listen deeply to others, and offer compassion and presence to your fellow church members and friends. Many who have attended small group ministries like these describe them as truly transformational experiences. 
 
Chalice Circles will include 8-10 participants who meet together over time to deepen relationships and practice living a Unitarian Universalist religious life. The groups for this year are organized around a variety of themes which you will find described in detail below, along with the group facilitators, meeting dates, and times.  Although our groups will meet online, you may participate by phone if you do not have a computer or internet access at home. 
 
To register for a Chalice Circle, please send an email to ChaliceCircles@uusm.org with the name of your preferred Chalice Circle in the subject line.  In the body of the email, include your name and contact information. You may also include a first and a second choice to be considered if space is available. If you do not have email, please contact the church office and let our staff know you’d like to participate in a Chalice Circle by phone. 
 
Chalice Circles Starting October 2020
 
Spirit in Practice
This Chalice Circle explores and nourishes the many ways in which regular disciplines, or practices, can help us connect with the sacred ground of our individual being.  Spirit in Practice affirms religious diversity while seeking unity in our communal quest for meaning and wholeness.  Topics will include personal and communal practices, mind and body practices, and justice practices amongst others.
 
Co-facilitators:  Patricia Wright and Cynthia Cottam
Date and time:  Third Tuesdays, October through June, 1 to 3 PM
 
Transitions and Passages
With monthly ministry themes as a starting place, we will explore the transitions and passages in our lives and the ways they have expanded the depth dimension of our lives.
 
Co-facilitators: Denise Helton and Bettye Barclay
Date and time: Third Thursdays, October through June, 1 to 3 PM
 
Poetry as a Spiritual Practice
Join us to explore the ways in which poetry can enrich our lives and deepen our spiritual practice. We will discuss topics like Beauty, Observing Nature, Social Conscience, and others. We look forward to sharing together.
 
Co-facilitators: Rima Snyder and Dorothy Steinicke
Date and time: Fourth Wednesday, October through June, 7 to 9 PM
 
CommUUnity Connections
This Chalice Circle is a place to come connect with our community by listening deeply, sharing our feelings, perspectives, and personal connections to a variety of topics. These topics may include our human connection to nature, personal growth, love, spirit, our inner narrative about current events, and connecting deeply with each other.
 
Co-facilitators: Wendi Gladstone and Margot Page
Date and time: Second Thursdays, October through June, 7 to 9 P.M.
 
Council Meeting
This small group ministry provides a space for people to be seen and heard through a facilitated practice for connecting to ourselves and our community through listening and speaking with intention. It is an opportunity to explore our growing edges, understand our shadows as protective responses to challenges. Through deep listening and sharing, we will practice connecting with ourselves and one another while expanding and deepening our community.
 
Co-facilitators: Jo An Peters and Grace Edgerly
Date and times: Third Mondays, October – June, 7:00-9:00 PM
 
Toward a Beloved Community Embracing Anti-racism: Telling Our Stories
This Chalice Circle offers the opportunity to engage together in the lifelong spiritual work of anti-racism and anti-oppression. We will do this by telling our own stories and exploring our relationship with race and racism. We will explore white identity and unearned privilege. We will look at how racism acts as a barrier to building beloved community. Together we will build a brave space so we may talk about the uncomfortable reality of racism in ourselves and in the larger community.
 
Co-facilitators: Sue Stoyanoff, Dorothy Steinicke, and Audrey Lyness
Date and times: Second Wednesdays, October - June, 7 to 9 PM
 
A 7-principled Perspective on Current Events
Featuring ways to explore current events, our group aims to maintain helpful and influential perspectives on today's news cycle from pre-election through the election and post-election phases and beyond. Grounded in UU principles, we hope to manage what we take in through media in a way that fosters spiritual health and growth.
 
Co-facilitators:  Tom Peters and Leon Henderson-MacLennan
Meets: Fourth Sundays, October through June, 12 to 2 PM
 
We hope you’ll register for a Chalice Circle today and help us create a vibrant liberal religious community together! 
 
Yours in ministry, 
 
Jeremiah                               Bettye 
Rev. Jeremiah Kalendae       Bettye Barclay
Developmental Minister        Chalice Circle Facilitators 
 

Generous Congregation Recipient:  UUA Disaster Relief Fund

 
We come together for more than ourselves. This month 50% of the Sunday offering will be donated to the UUA Disaster Relief Fund. The Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) Disaster Relief Fund is part of a covenant — a covenant between the UUA and congregations, between congregations who give generously and those in need, and with our community partners. Through aiding our congregations, their members, and their community partners, we are able to embody our faith and values.
 
Disasters impact our congregations and their communities with increasing rapidity. From natural disasters like wildfires and hurricanes to human caused disasters, UU congregations, people, and communities sustain the impact. Your donation allows our national organization to respond flexibly on your behalf to tragedies that overtake us.
 
Grants can be used for damage to congregations’ buildings, and relocation to temporary locations; damage to members/friends homes, and relocation expenses; donations to local partner organizations that serve the community at large, particularly those who would not be eligible for other funding; and certain expenses related to the COVID-19 Pandemic. For details, visit UUA Disaster Relief Fund.  Thank you for your generous support.

October Generous Congregation Supports UUA Disaster Relief Fund

 
 
 
Disasters impact our congregations and their communities with increasing rapidity. From natural disasters like wildfires and hurricanes to human-caused calamities, UU congregations, their members, and their community partners bear the impact.
 
The Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) Disaster Relief Fund is part of a covenant—a covenant between the UUA and congregations, between congregations who give generously and those in need, and with our community partners. By aiding other congregations, we act through our faith and values. Donations from across the nation allow the national organization to respond quickly and flexibly.
 
Grants can be used to repair damage to congregations’ buildings or for temporary relocation; to help members and friends who require housing assistance; to support partner organizations that serve the community on the scene, particularly those that would not be eligible for other funding. For grants related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, priority is given to UU organizations partnering with local organizations to support the larger community and at-risk individuals.
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to the UUA Disaster Relief Fund. Your donations will help congregations, their members, and their communities facing the impact of disasters.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and the UUA Disaster Relief Fund. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 
 
 
 
Sep 2020

Generous Congregation Recipient:
Community Services Unlimited: Paul Robeson Wellness Center

 
We come together for more than ourselves. This month 50% of the offering will be donated to the Community Services Unlimited: Paul Robeson Wellness Center.  Community Services Unlimited Inc. (CSU), is a 501c3 established in 1977 and headquartered in South Central Los Angeles. Since then it has created community programs and organizing campaigns like the early Safe Seniors to the more recent Free Medical Screening Program and the most recent From the Ground Up.
 
UUCCSM volunteers have helped CSU to refurbish the Veggie Bus classroom and seed library and to remodel the Paul Robeson Community Wellness Center. The Center includes a produce market, cafe, catering kitchen, community center, and programs promoting environmental and social justice and health.
 
CSU’s mission is to foster the creation of communities actively working to address the issues of unsustainable resources and unequal impact. We are committed to supporting and creating justice-driven, community-based programs and educational initiatives which foster dialogue and raise awareness.  Thank you for your generous support.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

September Generous Congregation Supports Community Services Unlimited
CONTINUING TO HELP BUILD HEALTHIER COMMUNITIES

 
 
The COVID-19 pandemic and Black Lives Matter movement have brought to the fore the extreme inequalities that impact the health and lives of black and brown communities in Los Angeles. Food deserts — areas where residents have limited access to a variety of healthy foods — were already problematic in low-income areas of Los Angeles. Since the stay-at-home order closed thousands of businesses across the county, many permanently, food banks have been inundated with requests from working-poor households experiencing loss of income. Standing in line for food has become a daily, full-time job for some.
 
Community Services Unlimited, based in South Central Los Angeles, has been working to build a healthier local community since 1977. CSU helps local families apply for food aid via CalFresh. But their primary focus is to work against the injustices of a food system steeped in unsustainable charity and based on poor-quality and unhealthy foods. Founded on community self-reliance, CSU coordinates local food production. Among many health initiatives, CSU distributes organic produce, much of which is grown on their urban farm. During the school year (not this year) children tour the farm and colorful Veggie Bus, learning how to grow food at home, and why healthy, locally grown food is so important.
 
Over the past five years, UUSM’s Faith in Action Committee has supported the ongoing health and environmental justice efforts of Community Services Unlimited. UUSM volunteers provided expertise and connections to raise funds to convert an old school bus into the Veggie Bus learning center, and pitched in with some hands-on labor. UUSM was pleased to connect CSU leadership with the Los Angeles Chapter of the US Green Building Council (USGBCLA) and the Self Help Credit Union (where substantial UUSM reserve funds are invested) as they undertook a substantial renovation of CSU’s Paul Robeson Community Wellness Center (PRCWC). The center includes a produce market, cafe, catering kitchen, and community center, and created a model for sustainable development and self-sufficiency. The PRCWC and the urban garden are the base of operations for CSU’s work in the community.
 
Many of CSU’s programs have been negatively impacted by COVID-19, but they continue to provide healthy organic produce at affordable prices from their Expo Park garden and other local organic producers. UUSM members have organized a Santa Monica drop-off point for CSU produce bags, which enables congregants and friends to receive a weekly bounty of organic fruits and veggies grown by local farmers. These weekly deliveries to Santa Monica support CSU’s ongoing programs, including discounted produce sales to households in South LA. It also gives us a chance to greet some of our (masked) church friends every Friday afternoon as we pick up our produce. (If you are interested in ordering a weekly organic produce bag at the Supporter rate, first email greenchair@uusm.org and then sign up on the CSU market site choosing the UUSM Private Drop Site).
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to Community Services Unlimited. Your support will help provide healthy organic food and preventive health services, while building the South LA community’s capacity to address issues of unsustainable resources and unequal impact.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and the great work of Community Services Unlimited. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 

Coming Soon: Chalice Circles at UUSM
SIGN UP BY SEPTEMBER 30

 
 
Chalice Circles are opportunities to explore ideas and delve into our beloved community this year.
 
As diverse as our community is, so too are the Chalice Circles being offered by your fellow congregants starting this fall. The Chalice Circle options are: Spirit in Practice, CommUUnity Connections, Poetry as a Spiritual Practice, Transitions and Passages, Anti-Racism: Telling Our Stories Toward a Beloved Community, Council Meeting, and A 7-Principled Perspective of Current Events.
 
Each circle will meet monthly from October through June on the Zoom platform.
 
Registration is open during September. Please send an e-mail to ChaliceCircles@uusm.org requesting the circle(s) in which you would like to participate. Registration closes September 30.
 
Spirit in Practice
 
This Chalice Circle explores and nourishes the many ways in which regular disciplines, or practices, can help us connect with the sacred ground of our individual being. Spirit in Practice affirms religious diversity while seeking unity in our communal quest for meaning and wholeness. Topics will include personal and communal practices, mind and body practices, and justice practices amongst others.
 
Co-facilitators: Patricia Wright and Cynthia Cottam
Date and time: Third Tuesdays, October through June, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
 
CommUUnity Connections
 
This Chalice Circle is a place to connect with our community by listening deeply, sharing our feelings, perspectives, and personal connections to a variety of topics. These topics may include our human connection to nature, personal growth, love, spirit, our inner narrative about current events, and connecting deeply with each other.
 
Co-facilitators: Wendi Gladstone and Margot Page
Date and time: Second Thursdays, October through June, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
 
Poetry as a Spiritual Practice
 
Join us to explore the ways in which poetry can enrich our lives and deepen our spiritual practice. We will discuss topics like Beauty, Observing Nature, Social Conscience, and others. We look forward to sharing together.
 
Co-facilitators: Rima Snyder and Dorothy Steinicke
Date and time: Fourth Wednesday, October through June, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
 
Transitions and Passages
 
With monthly ministry themes as a starting place, we will explore the transitions and passages in our lives and the ways they have expanded the depth dimension of our lives.
 
Co-facilitators: Denise Helton and Bettye Barclay
Date and time: Third Thursdays, October through June, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
 
Anti-Racism: Telling Our Stories Toward a Beloved Community.
 
This Chalice Circle offers the opportunity to engage together in the lifelong spiritual work of anti-racism and anti-oppression. We will do this by telling our own stories and exploring our relationship with race and racism. We will explore white identity and unearned privilege. We will look at how racism acts as a barrier to building beloved community. Together we will build a brave space so we may talk about the uncomfortable reality of racism in ourselves and in the larger community.
 
Co-facilitators: Sue Stoyanoff, Dorothy Steinicke and Audrey Lyness
Date and time: Second Wednesdays, October through June, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
 
Council Meeting
 
This small group ministry provides a space for people to be seen and heard in a facilitated practice for connecting to ourselves and our community through listening and speaking with intention. It is an opportunity to explore our growing edges, understand our shadows as protective responses to challenges. Through deep listening and sharing we will practice connecting with ourselves and one another while expanding and deepening our community.
 
Co-facilitators: Jo An Peters and Grace Edgerly
Date and times: Third Mondays, October – June, 7:00-9:00 pm
 
A 7-principled Perspective on Current Events
 
Featuring ways to explore current events, our group aims to maintain helpful and influential perspectives on today’s news cycle from pre-election through the election and post-election phases and beyond. Grounded in UU principles, we hope to manage what we take in through media in a way that fosters spiritual health and growth.
 
Co-facilitators: Tom Peters and Leon Henderson-MacLennan
Date and time: Fourth Sundays, October through June, 12:00 – 2:00 pm
 

Come Kick Off the #UUtheVote Campaign Sept 13
EXPLORE HOW WE CAN #UUTHEVOTE

 
 
 
 
Dear Friends,
 
The UUSM Board of Directors has committed that we will do all we can to fulfill our UUA’s #VoteLove pledge in November: we are fully committed to mobilizing the electorate and UUs in support of dignity and justice for all through our democratic process. 
 
And we invite you to join us on Sunday, September 13 at 11:30 a.m. as we gather online to organize for the remaining weeks before the election.
 
Already ready to sign on? Join the Santa Monica UU the Vote Team today!
 
You don’t need to be told about the importance of the November election, or to mail back your ballot early. But you might be wondering what else can you do to move the needle on the election, and who are the people you can do it with?
 
Well right now, you can take the #VoteLove pledge to mobilize the electorate and UUs. It states our faith’s values, that we are unequivocally: Pro-Migrant, Pro-Democracy, Pro-Equity & Liberation Movements, Pro-Human & Civil Rights for All, Pro-Reparations, and Pro-Sustainability.
 
Then join UUSM as we:
 
  • Act alongside advocates and issues that have direct and material impacts on the communities with which we have declared political solidarity.
  • Get Out the Vote through phone banks, text banks, postcards, and voter registration drives.
  • Have values-based conversations with our UU community and networks about our values and what we are voting for in 2020.
  • Participate in learning and political education to responsibly and effectively engage and organize in anti-racist and pro-democracy movements.
  • Share our resources with people and communities most deeply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and the decades-long campaign of voter suppression.
  • Turn out with resources, time, and support to fight against authoritarianism and in support of communities of Color, poor people, people with disabilities, immigrants, and Trans and Queer people in our congregation and community following the election.
  • Vote!

UUSMers are already phone banking, writing postcards, and working with civic and faith-based organizations like the League of Women Voters, Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice, and the UU Justice Ministry of California.

 
Now we’d like to invite you to join us as we plan to mobilize as a community in the precious remaining weeks before the election.
 
Please join us September 13 after the Sunday service at 11:30 am as we explore how we can all best #UUtheVote! RSVP here.
 
In solidarity,
Beth Brownlie
UUSM Board of Directors President
 
 
Aug 2020

August Generous Congregation Supports Camp de Benneville Pines
SAVE OUR CAMP!

 
 
Because of COVID-19, this year’s Santa Monica UU Family Retreat at Camp de Benneville Pines, slated to take place September 18-20, is canceled. The mid-September weekend has provided a moment for us to slow down and spend time together in the woods. But under today’s conditions of social distancing, church camp would just not work very well.
 
As a result, Camp de Benneville Pines is in serious financial trouble, and it is not clear if it will survive. We think about all the joy that we have found at our blessed retreat in the mountains and are motivated to help. Camp Director Janet James says that if the churches can raise the money that their members would have spent on coming to camp, then Camp de Benneville will survive.
 
As you consider, flash back to memories of last year’s UUSM sojourn up to the mountain.
 
Generous Congregation
 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation program supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to Camp de Benneville Pines. Your support will help keep our congregational home in the mountains afloat, and make sure it still serves as a UU gathering place and important youth camp in future, better times.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and Camp de Benneville. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” (or another amount) to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)
 
 
 
 
Jul 2020

De Benneville Pines: Help Save our Camp!
CAMP IS CANCELLED THIS YEAR - PLEASE HELP US SUSTAIN IT FOR FUTURE YEARS

 
 
Dear UU Friends of de Benneville Pines,
 
Because of COVID-19, this year’s Santa Monica UU Family Retreat, slated to take place September 18, 19 and 20, is cancelled.  Tie dye on the line2We are sad and disappointed to say that after careful consideration, we have decided that under today’s conditions, Church Camp as we know it would not work very well.
 
The retreat represents a gathering of people larger than what is considered safe, given social distancing. Room sharing would not be possible for singles, and the food serving protocol would also entail necessary but unwelcome changes, like no self-service salad bar.
 
Also, as a result of COVID-19, de Benneville Pines is in serious financial trouble, and it is not clear if it will survive. We think about all the joy that we have found at our blessed retreat in the mountains and are motivated to help. One way, if you can afford to do so, is to offer as a donation whatever you would have spent actually going up to Camp.
 
If you can afford it.
 
This is a big ask — but a reasonable one. Camp Director Janet James says that if the churches can raise the money that their members would have spent on coming to Camp, then de Benneville will survive.
 
Here is the fee structure from our registration form:
 
 
Find the “Make a Donation” button on the UUSM Church webpage (under What’s New on UUSM.org?) and you will see two online-donation options, UUSM Online and UUSM Mobile, where you can specify “de Benneville Pines Camp” under Program Support. You can also simply write a check and mail it to 1260 18th St. SM CA 90404.
 
Camp de Benneville Pines will indeed be closed for the near future, and for that we are sorry. Let’s think now for the long term and sustain the Camp that we love so much.
 
- The de Benneville Pines Planning Committee
Karl Lisovsky, Amy Brunell, Joyce Holmen, Linda Van Ligten, Chela Metzger, Sunni Pavlovic, Judith Martin-Straw
 
 
 
 

July Generous Congregation Supports Westside Food Bank
EMERGENCY AID NEEDED

 
 
As Los Angeles extends lockdown orders and many non-essential businesses remain closed due to coronavirus, thousands of furloughed and unemployed workers face poverty and food insecurity. Many people are turning to hunger-relief organizations to meet urgent needs, and Westside Food Bank is increasing its distribution to more than 70 local social service agencies, providing emergency food assistance.
 
UU Santa Monica has a long relationship with Westside Food Bank: volunteering, donating food, providing labor, and raising money. Most UUSM youth and young adults remember trekking over on a Sunday morning to sort food and learn more about hunger in our community. Right now, the most urgent need is cash. According to the website: “As the need for emergency food assistance skyrockets, we need your help to continue buying the truckloads of food required to keep our warehouse stocked.”

 

Generous Congregation

 
Our practice here at UUSM is to dedicate half of our non-pledge Sunday offerings to organizations doing work in the world that advances our Unitarian Universalist principles; the other 50% of the offering is used to support the life of our church.
 
UUSM’s Generous Congregation supports our church community. And together, we uplift the reach and impact of vital organizations doing work we could not do on our own. This month, half of our Sunday offerings will go to Westside Food Bank. Your support will help keep our vulnerable neighbors food secure. We can make a high volume of nutritious food available for free throughout this crisis.
 
Please consider supporting the mission of our church, and Westside Food Bank. To give right now, text “$10 GCC” to 844-982-0209. (One-time-only credit card registration required.)